THE GRAND
DOMESTIC REVOLUTION

THE GRAND
DOMESTIC REVOLUTION

USER'S MANUAL

USER'S MANUAL

‘The Grand Domestic Revolution—User’s Manual’ (GDR) investigates the domestic space and its (changing) use through a variety of methods and disciplines, traversing the fields of art, design, architecture, urban planning, activism and theory. A number of artists and other practitioners contribute to this endeavour. Residents from 2009-2011 include Sepake Angiama, Paul Elliman, and Doris Denekamp who utilized neighbourhood and online research to create prototypes and interventions around the theme of (Green) Cooperativsm. Wietske Maas and Travis Meinolf experimented with Home Production; while 'interor' infrastuctural interventions for the furniture, library and hallways were created by ifau & Jesko Fezer, Mirjam Thomann and Graziela Kunsch. Current themes and residents from February–October 2011 include Kyohei Sakaguchi and Kateřina Šedá who will each investigate forms of usership in architectures; home and housing rights with Maria Pask and Nazima Kadir; the question of invisible and domestic labour taken up by Werker Magazine; Agency will continue its deliberations on copyright issues of domestic THINGS (gardens and textiles); and keywords in relations to food service work will be workshopped with Xu Tan. Parallel to this, the Read-in activity continues. Initiated by artist Annette Krauss and theatre maker, Read-in is an open reading group inhabiting a different neighbour’s home for every session.

LIBRARY

LIBRARY

The GDR library constitutes the backbone of our ongoing ‘living research’ and thus grows over time. The library offers points of engagement with the project and consists of different research materials such as books, articles, images and DVDs (artist’s video, films) that are available for viewing when visiting the apartment. The first installment was done by the GDR team and was later adapted by Sao Paulo-based artist Graziela Kunsch who suggested that the GDR team create thematic selections.

APARTMENT 18B

APARTMENT 18B

'The Grand Domestic Revolution-User's Manual' is a long-term project developed as Casco’s contribution to 'Utrecht Manifest: Biennial for Social Design'. The project deals with the evolutionary and collaborative process of “living” research in the contemporary domestic and private sphere – particularly in relation to the spatial imagining (or the built environment). It aims at re-articulating while exercising the notions of the social, the public and, eventually, the commons.

TOWN MEETINGS

IN AFFINITY

IN AFFINITY

Since August 2010, the GDR team have undertaken research in order to connect with the local neighbourhood on questions relating to peoples’ social conditions and material environments. Questionnaires, interviews, and conversations are the methods used to explore the themes and problems addressed in GDR, such as self-organised governance, co-operative living, and spatial organisation in and from the domestic sphere.

GDR CALL FOR AUDITIONS

'OUR AUTONOMOUS LIFE?'
Auditions for a cooperative sitcom
Saturday 3 September, 11-14h

Ruth Buchanan & Andreas Muller, sketch of GDR livingroom 'set'


Is communal living driving you crazy?
Are diminishing housing rights getting you down?
Do you often imagine how "living together" could be different?

GDR invites squatters, centraal wonen residents, anti-squatters, ecological villagers and anyone who has a stake in housing issues and practices of co-living to audition for the new cooperative sitcom,'Our Autonomous Life?'. Approximately 10 people will be chosen to participate in a 4-part weekend workshop series in September and October 2011 which will culminate in a 4-episode sitcom unfolded monthly at the final GDR exhibition (opening 5 November, 2011) and broadcast locally through RTV Utrecht.

Through sharing stories of conflict and power struggles, solidarity and creativity from their own co-living experiences, participants will take part in collective learning processes of collaborative scriptwriting, character building, gesture making and building visual and spatial design constructions. They will work with a professional production team and special guests from diverse fields such as architecture, comedy, social housing and theatre and to depict new narratives of "living together" in critical and imaginative ways in constant reflection on the co-relationships between physical building practices and practice of "building the commons".

Produced by Casco, co-conceived with artist Maria Pask and social anthropologist Nazima Kadir (who's PhD dissertation "The Autonomous life?: Paradoxes of Hierarchy, Authority, and Urban Identity in the Amsterdam Squatters Movement" was the inspiration for the project), the sitcom offers a glimpse into the behind-the-scenes life of a fictional communal living group (woongroep) in Utrecht. It will be filmed within the "domestic set" inside Casco's space designed by artist Ruth Buchanan and architect Andreas Müller as a translation of the GDR apartment - a site that will encourage playfully undoing and reinventing relations and affects with one another.


AUDITION DETAILS

Location: Casco, Office for Art, Design and Theory, Nieuwekade 213-215 Utrecht.

Drop in anytime this Saturday for group audition sessions between 11.00-14.00 at Casco. The auditions will be informal and convivial, a chance for us to get to know you and for you to learn more about the project. The "panel" includes Amsterdam artist Maria Pask, GDR Associate Curator, Maiko Tanaka, Social Anthropologist and former Amsterdam squatter Nazima Kadir (via skype) and Amsterdam comedy writer and performer, Wart Kamps.

Please prepare a brief story on your co-living conflicts including a proposal(s) of practical, spatial,imaginative and/or political ideas for creating different ways of living together.

No previous experience in TV production is necessary!


Contact us for further information at gdr@cascoprojects.org.

NOTES

Dymaxion Sleep

Dymaxion Sleep


Dymaxion Sleep is a structure of nets suspended over a field of aromatic plants. Rather than walking through the garden, visitors lie on top of it, translating the typically solitary experience of a garden into a public event. The structure that holds the nets is an unfolded icosahedron, formed of twenty steel triangles. Each triangle is large enough to support a single outstretched body, an intertwined pair, or a pileup of people. The structure is anchored to a timber footing which traces the diagram of the icosahedron on the soil. Mints, lemon geranium, lavender and fennel are planted below, mimicking the structure's topography and defining scented territories in which to relax.


The form of each layer of this double surface, planting and nets, is based on Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion World Map. If Fuller's Map reconfigured standard political representations of the world by refusing to define a fixed orientation, Dymaxion Sleep sets up a surface on which to lounge in undefined ways. Dymaxion Sleep takes its name from the title of a 1943 Time magazine article which describes Fuller’s regimen of polyphasic sleep - thirty minutes asleep, followed by six waking hours - a reconfiguration he used to dynamically maximize his body’s productivity. Our Dymaxion Sleep subverts Fuller’s focus on efficiency and work and instead maximizes the garden as a space for pleasure and dreams.

Collaborator
Walter Blackwell
Architect: Jane Hutton & Adrian Blackwell
Years of exhibition: 2009, 2010, 2011


1 June 2011, 11.59 — posted by Casco


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